CALIFORNIA SCHOOL FOR THE BLIND

 

2005-06

School Accountability Report

 


Executive Summary School Accountability Report Card, 2005-2006

 

For the California School for the Blind

 

Address:                  500 Walnut Avenue            Phone:             (510) 794 3800

                                Fremont, CA   94536         

Superintendent:      Stuart Wittenstein, Ed.D.     Grade Span:     Pre-school to 21 years or graduation

 

 

This executive summary of the School Accountability Report Card (SARC) is intended to provide parents and community members with a quick snapshot of school accountability. The data presented in this report are reported for the 2005-06 school year, except the School Finances and School Completion data that are reported for the 2004-05 school year. For additional information about the school, parents and community members should review the entire SARC or contact the school superintendent.

 

 

About This School

  The California School for the Blind provides intensive, disability specific educational services for enrolled students who are blind, visually impaired, deafblind, and visually impaired/multi-disabled, whose primary learning needs are related to their visual impairment.

   In partnership with students, families, other consumers, local educational agencies, professional and community resources, California School for the Blind prepares students to participate at their highest level of independence in their schools, workplaces, and communities.

  The California School for the Blind, as a State Special School of the California Department of Education, is a statewide resource offering expertise in the low prevalence disabilities of visual impairment and deafblindness through innovative model programs, assessment, consultation and technical assistance, professional development, research and publications, advocacy, and outreach.

   The school offers classrooms for students from 3 to 21 with the need for disability specific instruction as a visually impaired, blind, or deaf-blind student, many with additional disabilities.   


 

 

Student Enrollment

 

Group

Enrollment

 Number of Students

77    

 African American   

9.1 % 

 American Indian or Alaska Native   

0.0 % 

 Asian   

13.0 % 

 Filipino   

2.6 % 

 Hispanic or Latino   

29.9 %  

 Pacific Islander   

2.6 % 

 White (Not Hispanic)   

42.9 % 

 Multiple or No Response   

0.0 % 

 Socioeconomically Disadvantaged   

18.2 % 

 English Learners   

3.0 % 

 Students with Disabilities   

100.0 % 

 


 

 

Teachers

 

Indicator

Teachers

Teachers with full credential

25

Teachers without full credential

0

Teachers Teaching Outside

  Subject Area of Competence

0

Misassignments of Teachers

  of English Learners

0

Total Teacher Misassignments

0

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 

 

 

 

School Facilities

 

All facilities are inspected annually.  No major problems were identified. 

 

Repairs Needed

  Ongoing maintenance included at least two significant projects.  A contract to replace the roofs of buildings 55 and 56 was completed.  Work is to commence with the new school year.  The ongoing effort to install outdoor, tactile maps continues.  Fall installation is anticipated.  An exterior gas leak has been detected.  Although this represents no danger to individuals or plant, a plan for repair is being formed.

 

Corrective Actions Taken or Planned

  All items noted in the facilities inspection have been addressed. 

 


 

Curriculum and Instructional Materials

 

Each student attending the school is assessed annually to determine the appropriate learning media/medium as well as for the preferred lighting and seating conditions necessary to optimize learning.  Materials are then put in Braille, print, larger print, auditory, or a combination of formats.

 

 

 

Student Performance

 

Subject

Students Proficient

and Above on

California

Standards Tests

English-Language Arts

10 

Mathematics

Science

History-Social Science

 

 

 

 

 

 

School Completion

 

 

Indicator

 

Result

Graduation Rate

100%*

*100% of eligible students received diplomas and/or certificates of completion.

School Finances

 

Level

Expenditures

Per Pupil

(Unrestricted

Sources Only)

School Site

$76,321

State

$

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Academic Progress

 

 

 

 

Indicator

 

 

 

Result

2006 API Growth Score

  (from 2005 API Growth Report)

499

Statewide Rank

  (from 2005 API Base Report)

1*

2006-07 Program Improvement

  Status

Met

*A sufficient numbers of students weren’t tested in order to make comparisons.

 

 

 

Postsecondary Preparation

 

Measures

Percent of

Graduates

Completed a Career Technical

  Education Program

%

Completed All Courses Required for

  University of California or California

  State University Admission

20%

 

 

 


School Accountability Report Card

Reported for School Year 2005-06

Published During 2006-07

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Opportunities for Parental Involvement

This section provides information about opportunities for parents to become involved with school activities. 

   The Parents and Friends Association of the California School for the Blind offers parents the opportunity to participate in the school an dormitory programs.  Volunteers are encouraged to contact President Linda Jaquez.

   The volunteer coordinator at the school, LaWanda Vann, makes arrangements for parents to participate.

 

 

 

Student Enrollment by Grade Level

This table displays the number of students enrolled in each grade level at the school.

Grade Level

Number of Students

Grade Level

Number of Students

Kindergarten

 

Grade 8

 

Grade 1

 

Ungraded Elementary

36

Grade 2

 

Grade 9

 

Grade 3

 

Grade 10

 

Grade 4

 

Grade 11

 

Grade 5

 

Grade 12

 

Grade 6

 

Ungraded Secondary

46

Grade 7

 

Total Enrollment

82

 

Student Enrollment by Group

This table displays the percent of students enrolled at the school who are identified as being in a particular group.

Group

Percent of

Total Enrollment

Group

Percent of

Total Enrollment

 African American

9.1 

 White (not Hispanic)

42.9 

 American Indian or Alaska Native

0.0 

 Multiple or No Response

0.0 

 Asian

13.0 

 Socioeconomically Disadvantaged

18.2 

 Filipino

2.6 

 English Learners

3.0 

 Hispanic or Latino

29.9 

 Students with Disabilities

100.0 

 Pacific Islander

2.6 

 ---

 ---

 

Average Class Size and Class Size Distribution (Elementary)

This table displays by grade level the average class size and the number of classrooms that fall into each size category (a range of total students per classroom).

 

Grade

Level

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

Avg.

Class

Size

Number of

Classrooms

Avg.

Class

Size

Number of

Classrooms

Avg.

Class

Size

Number of

Classrooms

1-20

21-32

33+

1-20

21-32

33+

1-20

21-32

33+

K

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

K-3

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3-4

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4-8

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Other

5.2

8

 

 

4.9

8

 

 

4.5

8

 

 

 

Average Class Size and Class Size Distribution (Secondary)

This table displays by subject area the average class size and the number of classrooms that fall into each size category (a range of total students per classroom).

Subject

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

Avg.

Class

Size

Number of Classrooms

Avg.

Class

Size

Number of Classrooms

Avg.

Class

Size

Number of Classrooms

1-22

23-32

33+

1-22

23-32

33+

1-22

23-32

33+

Other

4.9

10

 

 

5.1

9

 

 

5.8

8

 

 

 

 

II. School Climate

 

School Discipline Practices

This section provides information about the school's efforts to create and maintain a positive learning environment, including the school’s use of disciplinary strategies.

 

 The school has developed a discipline that emphasizes the positive accomplishments of students.  We are deeply committed to a system of positive behavioral intervention, recognizing the accomplishments and achievements of each individual student.  Staff are trained in behavioral intervention techniques (CPI) should interventions be required.  A clear statement of the rewards for positive behaviors and consequence of negative behaviors is outlined. 

 Each teacher is responsible for developing and in implementing a classroom management program appropriate for the level and needs of the students assigned to the classroom.  The teacher informs the students of classroom rules and provides consequences for adherence and infractions.  Teachers acknowledge both individual and group adherence to classroom rules through intermediate and delayed reinforcement.  Intermediate reinforcement occurs in the form of stickers, verbal praise, or a choice of a favorite activity.  Delayed reinforcement occurs as classroom special events, making choices for free time or community outings.  Teachers are encouraged to focus on developing the positive behaviors that will ensure success at school, at home, in the workplace, and in the community.  These behaviors include following directions, taking responsibility for self-control, and appropriate social interaction.  Students are encouraged to work through alternative approaches handling a situation that results in infractions in any of these areas.  Since participation in school activities comprises at least one-third of the student’s day, CSB provides an environment that can develop characteristics that will be effective in all areas of the student’s life including self-advocacy skill development  

 

Suspensions and Expulsions

This table displays the rate of suspensions and expulsions (the total number of incidents divided by the total enrollment) at the school and district levels for the most recent three-year period.

Rate

School

District

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

Suspensions

18

11

8

18

11

To be provided by LEA

 

 

To be provided by LEA

 
8

Expulsions

0

0

0

0

0

0

 

 

III. School Facilities

 

School Facility Conditions and Improvements

This section provides information about the condition of the school’s grounds, buildings, and restrooms, and a description of any planned or recently completed facility improvements.

   All facilities are inspected annually.  No major problems were identified. 

   Ongoing maintenance included at least two significant projects.  A contract to replace the roofs of buildings 55 and 56 was completed.  Work is to commence with the new school year.  The ongoing effort to install outdoor, tactile maps continues.  Fall installation is anticipated.  An exterior gas leak has been detected.  Although this represents no danger to individuals or plant, a plan for repair is being formed.

     All items noted in the facilities inspection have been addressed. 

 

School Facility Good Repair Status

This table displays the results of the most recently completed school site inspection to determine the school facility’s good repair status.

Item Inspected

Facility in

Good Repair

Repair Needed and

Action Taken or Planned

Yes

No

Gas Leaks

 

X

Repair procedures for an exterior leak are being investigated.

Mechanical Systems

X

 

 

 

 

To be provided by LEA

 

Windows/Doors/Gates (interior and exterior)

X

 

 

Interior Surfaces (walls, floors, and ceilings)

X

 

 

Hazardous Materials (interior and exterior)

X

 

 

Structural Damage

X

 

 

Fire Safety

X

 

 

Electrical (interior and exterior)

X

 

 

Pest/Vermin Infestation

X

 

 

Drinking Fountains (inside and outside)

X

 

 

Restrooms

X

 

Contracts are in process for making bathrooms ADA compliant as needed.

Sewer

X

 

 

Playground/School Grounds

X

 

 

Other

X

 

 

 

IV. Teachers

 

Teacher Credentials

This table displays the number of teachers assigned to the school with a full credential, without a full credential, and those teaching outside of their subject area of competence. Detailed information about teacher qualifications can be found at the CDE Web site at http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/.

Teachers

School

 

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

With Full Credential

 24

 26

 25

Without Full Credential

 2

 2

0

Teaching Outside Subject Area of Competence

0

0

0

 

Core Academic Classes Taught by No Child Left Behind Compliant Teachers

This table displays the percent of classes in core academic subjects taught by No Child Left Behind (NCLB) compliant and non-NCLB compliant teachers at the school, at all schools in the district, at high-poverty schools in the district, and at low-poverty schools in the district. More information on teacher qualifications required under NCLB can be found at the CDE Web site at http://www.cde.ca.gov/nclb/sr/tq/.

Location of Classes

Percent of Classes In Core Academic Subjects

Taught by

NCLB Compliant Teachers

Taught by

Non-NCLB Compliant Teachers

This School 

100%

0.0%

 

Substitute Teacher Availability

This section provides information about the availability of qualified substitute teachers and the impact of any difficulties in this area on the school’s instructional program.

   During the 2005-6 school year substitute teachers were used in all classrooms.  Substitute teachers were used to cover leave time requested by teachers including illness, personal leave, jury duty, and personal holidays.

Substitute teaches have applied for these positions as a result of their acquaintance with CSB employees, because of the school’s reputation, and because of presentations made by CSB staff at local universities for the purpose of recruiting.  Following a formal interview and background check, new substitute teachers are brought in for an orientation to observe a variety of potential classrooms.  In a case where a substitute is unavailable to cover a class, administrative stff will do so. 

   A Substitute Teacher Manual is presented to each substitute.

 

Teacher Evaluation Process

This section provides information about the procedures and the criteria used for teacher evaluations.

   The teacher evaluation process was adopted in 1971.  New teachers are evaluated three times during the probationary process and at least once a year thereafter in accordance with Government Code sections 19992-1992.14 and Department of Personnel Administration rules 599.795-599.98.  All permanent status teachers are evaluated on an annual basis.  During the 2oo5-6 school year, all certificated teachers were evaluated using this process.

   All teachers are evaluated in the areas of Personal Characteristics, Professional Attitudes, Relationships with Others, Teacher Competency, and Classroom Dynamics.  Each teacher is provided with the Duty Statement as it pertains to his or her specific classroom assignment.  Each teacher meets individually with his or her direct supervisor prior to the end of the school year to review the summative evaluation prepared by the direct supervisor.  Teachers are encouraged to provide supporting documentation for the evaluation areas as they relate to awards, conference attendance, presentations at conferences, university coursework, and articles submitted for

   The teacher evaluation process is currently being revised.  Trial modules are being tested as supplements to the mandated evaluation process. 

 

V. Support Staff

 

Academic Counselors and Other Support Staff

This table displays, in units of full-time equivalents (FTE), the number of academic counselors and other support staff who are assigned to the school and the average number of students per academic counselor. One FTE equals one staff member working full time; one FTE could also represent two staff members who each work 50 percent of full time.

Title

Number of FTE

Assigned to School

Average Number of

Students per

Academic Counselor

 Academic Counselor

 NA

NA

 Library Media Teacher (Librarian)

 

 ---

 Library Media Services Staff (paraprofessional)

 

 ---

 Psychologist

  3.0

 ---

 Social Worker

 

 ---

 Nurse

 b

 ---

 Speech/Language/Hearing Specialist

  2.0

 ---

 Resource Specialist (non-teaching)

 

 ---

 Other

  14.0

 ---

 a-Psychologists provide counseling services to students

 b-Nursing services are provided by California School for the Deaf staff.  The Student Health Unit is staffed 24 all hours

    students are on campus.

 

VI. Curriculum and Instructional Materials

 

Quality, Currency, and Availability of Textbooks and Instructional Materials

This table displays information about the quality, currency, and availability of the standards-aligned textbooks and    other instructional materials used at the school, and information about the school’s use of any supplemental curriculum or non-adopted textbooks or instructional materials.

 

            Each student attending the school is assessed annually to determine the appropriate learning media/medium as well as for the preferred lighting and seating conditions necessary to optimize learning.  Materials are then put in Braille, print, larger print, auditory, or a combination of formats.

 

 

VII. School Finances

 

Expenditures Per Pupil and School Site Teacher Salaries (Fiscal Year 2004-05)

This table displays a comparison of the school’s per pupil expenditures from unrestricted (basic) sources with other schools in the district and throughout the state, and a comparison of the average teacher salary at the school site with average teacher salaries at the district and state levels. Detailed information regarding school expenditures and teacher salaries can be found at the CDE Web site at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ds/fd/ec/ and http://www.cde.ca.gov/ds/fd/cs/.

Level

Total

Expenditures

Per Pupil

Expenditures

Per Pupil

(Supplemental)

Expenditures

Per Pupil

(Basic)

Average

Teacher

Salary

School Site

$76,321

$9814

$66,507

$52,676

State

---

---

 

To be provided by LEA

 

Percent Difference – School Site and State

---

---

 

 

 

To be provided by LEA

 
Types of Services Funded

This section provides information about the programs and supplemental services that are available at the school and funded through either categorical or other sources.

   The California School for the Blind offers disability specific programs for blind, visually impaired,

And deaf-blind students, many with additional disabilities but who would benefit from instruction in the Expanded Core Curriculum and Orientation and Mobility.  Students are in small classes where they are afforded the opportunity to participate in intensive instructional programs designed to provide them skills to be successful in their local educational agency (LEA).

 

Teacher and Administrative Salaries (Fiscal Year 2004-05)

This table displays district-level salary information for teachers, principals, and superintendents, and compares these figures to the state averages for districts of the same type and size. The table also displays teacher and administrative salaries as a percent of a district's budget, and compares these figures to the state averages for districts of the same type and size. Detailed information regarding salaries may be found at the CDE Web site at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ds/fd/cs/ and http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/sa/salaries0405.asp.

Category

District

Amount

State Average

For Districts

In Same Category

Beginning Teacher Salary

$40,056 

$33.293 

Mid-Range Teacher Salary

$53,340

                 $48,524

Highest Teacher Salary

$66,624

$61,782

Average Principal Salary

 $80,412 

$81,497 

Superintendent Salary

 $112,332

$100,823

Percent of Budget for Teacher Salaries

30.01%

36.4 %

Percent of Budget for Administrative Salaries

5.22%

 6.5%

 

 

VIII. Student Performance

 

California Standards Tests

The California Standards Tests (CSTs) show how well students are doing in relation to the state content standards. The CSTs include English-language arts and mathematics in grades 2 through 11; science in grades 5, 8, 9, 10, and 11; and history-social science in grades 8, 10, and 11. Student scores are reported as performance levels. Detailed information regarding CST results for each grade and performance level, including the percent of students not tested, can be found at the CDE Web site at http://star.cde.ca.gov. Note: To protect student privacy, scores are not shown when the number of students tested is 10 or less.

 

 

 

 

CST Results by Student Group – Most Recent Year

This table displays the percent of students, by group, achieving at the Proficient or Advanced level (meeting or exceeding the state standards) for the most recent testing period.

Group

Percent of Students Scoring at Proficient or Advanced

English-

Language Arts

Mathematics

Science

History-

Social Science

 African American

 *

 *

 *

 *

 American Indian or Alaska Native

 

 

 

 

 Asian

 *

 *

 *

 *

 Filipino

 *

 

 *

 *

 Hispanic or Latino

 *

 *

 *

 *

 Pacific Islander

 *

 *

 

 

 White (Not Hispanic)

 15

 *

 *

 *

 Male

 0

 9

 *

 *

 Female

 27

 18

 *

 *

 Economically Disadvantaged

 *

 *

 *

 *

 English Learners

 *

 *

 *

 

 Students with Disabilities

 13

 13

 *

 *

 Students Receiving Migrant Education Services

 

 

 

 

 

Norm-Referenced Test

The norm-referenced test (NRT), currently the California Achievement Test, Sixth Edition (CAT/6), shows how well students are doing compared to students nationally in reading, language, spelling, and mathematics in grades 3 and 7 only. The results are reported as the percent of tested students scoring at or above the national average (the 50th percentile). Detailed information regarding NRT results for each grade level can be found at the CDE Web site at http://star.cde.ca.gov/. Note: To protect student privacy, scores are not shown when the number of students tested is 10 or less.

 

NRT Results for All Students – Three-Year Comparison

This table displays the percent of students scoring at or above the national average (the 50th percentile) in reading and mathematics.

Subject

School

District

State

2004

2005

2006

2004

2005

2006

2004

2005

2006

 Reading

 17

 *

 *

 17

 *

 *

 43

 41

 42

 Mathematics

 0

 *

 *

 0

 *

 *

 51

 52

 53

 

IX. Accountability

 

Academic Performance Index

The Academic Performance Index (API) is an annual measure of the academic performance and progress of schools in California. API scores range from 200 to 1,000, with a statewide target of 800. Detailed information about the API can be found at the CDE Web site at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/ap/.

 

API Ranks – Three-Year Comparison

This table displays the school’s statewide and similar schools API ranks. The statewide API rank ranges from 1 to 10. A statewide rank of 1 means that the school has an API score in the lowest 10 percent of all schools in the state, while a statewide rank of 10 means that the school has an API score in the highest 10 percent of all schools in the state. The similar schools API rank reflects how a school compares to 100 statistically matched “similar schools.” A similar schools rank of 1 means that the school’s academic performance is comparable to the lowest performing 10 schools of the 100 similar schools, while a similar schools rank of 10 means that the school’s academic performance is better than at least 90 of the 100 similar schools.

API Rank

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

Statewide

1

1

1

 

API Changes by Student Group – Three-Year Comparison

This table displays by student group the actual API changes in points added or lost for the past three years, and the most recent API score. Note: "N/A" means that the student group is not numerically significant.

Group

Actual API Change

API Score

2003-04

2004-05

2005-06

2006

All Students at the School

-64

+2

+28

499

Students with Disabilities

---

---

+28

499

 

 

Adequate Yearly Progress

The federal NCLB Act requires that all schools and districts meet the following Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) criteria:

  • Participation rate on the state’s standards-based assessments in English-language arts (ELA) and mathematics
  • Percent proficient on the state’s standards-based assessments in ELA and mathematics
  • API as an additional indicator
  • Graduation rate (for secondary schools)

Detailed information about AYP, including participation rates and percent proficient results by student group, can be found at the CDE Web site at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/ac/ay/.

 

 

 

X. School Completion and Postsecondary Preparation

 

Dropout Rate and Graduation Rate

This table displays the school’s one-year dropout rates and graduation rates for the most recent three-year period. For comparison purposes, data are also provided at the district and state levels. Detailed information about dropout rates and graduation rates can be found at the CDE Web site at http://dq.cde.ca.gov/dataquest/.

Indicator

School

State

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

2002-03

2003-04

2004-05

Dropout Rate (1-year)

0.0

0.0

0.0

 

 

 

Graduation/Certificate of Completion Rate

100%

100%

100%

 

 

 

 

Completion of High School Graduation Requirements

Beginning with the graduating class of 2006, students in California public schools must pass both the English-language arts and mathematics portions of the California High School Exit Examination (CAHSEE) to receive a high school diploma. For students who began the 2005-06 school year in the 12th grade, this table displays by student group the percent of students who met all state and local graduation requirements for grade 12 completion, including having passed both portions of the CAHSEE or received a local waiver or state exemption. Detailed information about the CAHSEE can be found at the CDE Web site at http://www.cde.ca.gov/ta/tg/hs/. Note: "N/A" means that the student group is not numerically significant.

Group

 

School

State

All Students*

100%

 

Students with Disabilities#

100%

 

*All matriculating students eligible to graduate received diplomas.

 

XI. Instructional Planning and Scheduling

 

School Instruction and Leadership

This section provides information about the structure of the school's instructional program and the experience of the school’s leadership team.

 The California School for the Blind serves a diverse student population. 90% of the students have multiple-disabilities in addition to their visual impairment; 10% are deaf-blind, the majority also multi-disabled; 10% are considered to be only blind or visually impaired, and functioning at or near grade level.

   With these facts in mind, CSB attempts to meet the unique needs of each student as assessed and identified through the IEP process. Teaching staff is well qualified and of a high professional caliber of teachers and administrative staff; many of whom are active as officers or members in numerous professional organizations. These include: CTEVH (California Transcribers and Educators of the Visually Handicapped), CAOMS (California Association of Orientation and Mobility Instructors), IAEDB and AEDB (International and American Associations for the Education of the Deaf-Blind), LIDAC (Low Incidence Disability Advisory Committee), TASH (The Association for the Severely Handicapped), AER (Association for the Education and Rehabilitation of the Blind and Visually Impaired), CAT (Center for Assistive Technology) and CEC (Council for Exceptional Children). CSB staff members have received recognition or awards by various organizations including AER, CEC, CTEVH, CAPHERD (California Association for Physical Education, Recreation and Dance), and others.

   The education and transition programs at CSB focus on the expanded core curriculum for students who are blind or visually impaired. This nationally accepted curriculum includes skills training in braille reading and writing, orientation and mobility, assistive technology, career education, adapted physical education, music, art, recreation and leisure, independent living, and functional academics. The aim of training in these curricular areas is to prepare students to be fully integrated into school in their home district by making the general education curriculum. For some students, particularly in the transition program, the goal is for each student to attain his or her potential in integration into the work force and community living.

   CSB is particularly proud of its commitment to braille literacy and hosts such special events and programs as: the Braille Bee, the Who Wants to Be a Braille Millionaire contest, and the Lucky Touch Braille Fortune Cookie Company.

   The recreational and after school program offers a wide variety of activities for residential and day students. The focus of this recreational program is to offer students the opportunities to explore activities similar to what they might experience in their home communities. A wide range of athletic and leisure activities are offered for students to choose from in semester sessions. Most popular are: swimming, karate, goalball, tandem bicycling, music groups, dance groups, international pen pals on tape, art, cooking and roller skating. Many CSB athletes are also members of the Alameda County Special Olympics team and the United States Association of Blind Athletes. Boy Scouts of America has been active at for many years. And, in fact, Scout Troop 2 is the oldest Boy Scout Troop in the Bay Area. Many students have participated in the meetings, campouts, jamborees and rallies with Scout Troop 2 and Cub Scouts. The music program is open to students with talents in vocal and instrumental performance. The CSB Jazz Ensemble has performed

 

Professional Development

This section provides information about the program for training the school's teachers and other professional staff.

   Staff are offered frequent opportunity to obtain in-service training.  The week before students arrive is dedicated to providing training to staff in the dormitories and school.  Additional on-campus training is offered during the school year.  Participation in college and university coursework if facilitated.  A close relationship with San Francisco State University, Department of Special Education,  Visually Impaired and Orientation and Mobility  Teacher Training Programs is maintained.

    CSB works closely with professional organizations, community agencies, and consumer groups.  The Lowenfeld-Akeson Early Childhood Symposium occurs annually on campus.  Staff are frequent contributors to the sponsorship, participation, and presentations offered at the annual CTEVH conference.  The conference serves as an annual source of training for staff as well. 

    Specially designed training programs are offered to new employees and classroom assistants.  Student Assistants must be enrolled in a college program as a condition of their jobs.   

 

Instructional Minutes

This table displays a comparison of the number of instructional minutes offered at the school to the state requirement for each grade level.

Grade Level

Instructional Minutes

Offered

State Requirement

K

N/A 

 36,000

1

60840

 50,400

2

 60840 

 50,400

3

 60840

 50,400

4

 60840

 54,000

5

 60840

 54,000

6

 60840 

 54,000

7

 60840

 54,000

8

 60840

 54,000

9

 60840

 64,800

10

 60840

 64,800

11

 60840

 64,800

12

 60840

 64,800

 

Minimum Days in School Year

The section provides information about the total number of days in the most recent school year that students attended school on a shortened day schedule and the reasons for the shortened day schedule.

   Instructional days are computed on a weekly basis.  Students leave at 2:00PM on Fridays and the days before holidays to facilitate safe and comfortable travel to their state-wide destinations